Africa Development

 

The Sudan Tribute [sic Tribune] recently reported that its eponymous country signed a deal with China to explore the viability of constructing a railway from Port Sudan to N’Djamena, with an eye on completing a long-awaited connectivity project that had hitherto been held up due to various degrees of regional instability. According to the publication, the original plan was to link up the Chadian and even nearby Central African Republic capitals with the Red Sea in order to provide these resource-rich landlocked states with an outlet to the global marketplace, which is increasingly becoming Asia-centric ergo the Eastern vector of this initiative. In terms of the bigger picture, however, the successful completion of the Port Sudan-N’Djamena Railway would constitute a crucial component of China’s unstated intentions to construct what the author had previously referred to as the “Sahelian-Saharan Silk Road”, the relevant portion of which (the Chad-Sudan Corridor) is a slight improvisation of Trans-African Highway 6.

Per the hyperlinked analysis above, the following custom map illustrates the full cross-continental vision that China has in mind:

 

Red: CCS (Cameroon-Chad-Sudan) Silk Road
Gold: Trans-African Highway 5
Lavender: Ethiopia-Nigeria Silk Road (the most direct route through resource-rich territory)
Pink: West African Rail Loop
Blue: Lagos-Calabar Silk Road
Green: Lagos-Kano Silk Road
Yellow: Port Harcourt-Maiduguri Silk Road

Each of the aforementioned tracks are described in a bit more detail in the cited article about the Sahelian-Saharan Silk Road and the author’s extensive Hybrid War study on Nigeria, but the two pertinent points to focus on in this piece are the CCS Silk Road (outlined in red on the map) and its larger purpose in possibly connecting Africa’s two largest countries and future Great Powers of Nigeria and Ethiopia. One of China’s grand strategic objectives in the emerging Multipolar World Order is to lay the infrastructural groundwork for facilitating the robust full-spectrum integration between these two giants, understanding that their Beijing-built bicoastal connectivity would bestow the People’s Republic with significant influence in the continent by streamlining an unprecedented corridor between them, thereby giving China the potential to more directly shape Africa’s overall development across the 21st century.

It goes without saying that Sudan is poised to play an indispensable role in making this happen by virtue of its advantageous geography in allowing China to circumnavigate the “Failed State Belt” of South Sudan, the Central African Republic, and increasingly, maybe even Cameroon, as well by charting an overland Silk Road connectivity corridor between Ethiopia and Nigeria via Sudan and Chad. Moreover, the potential linkage of the planned Ethiopia-Sudan railwayto the prospective Port Sudan-N’Djamena railroad would enable Sudan to provide China with alternative access to these two landlocked states. Regional military leader and energy exporter Chad is already in physical touch with the outside world through Cameroon, just as the world’s fastest-growing economy and rising African hegemon Ethiopia utilizes the newly built Djibouti-Addis Ababa railway for this purpose, but the shrewd and far-sighted Chinese always feel more comfortable if they’re not dependent on a single route, hence the strategic importance of supplementary access to Chad and Ethiopia through Port Sudan.

While Sudan’s financial standing was left reeling ever since the American-backed separation of oil-rich South Sudan in 2011, Khartoum might fortuitously find itself wheeling and dealing along the New Silk Road if it’s successful in providing China with alternative market access to Chad and Ethiopia in the future, and especially if it can do the same with Nigeria in saving China the time in having to sail all the way around the Cape of Good Hope in order to trade with it. For as easy as all of this may sound, however, the premier challenge that China will have to confront is to ensure the security of this traditionally unstable transit space, specifically in the context of maintaining peace in the former hotspot of Darfur and dealing with the plethora of destabilization scenarios emanating from the Lake Chad region (Boko Haram, Nigeria’s possible fragmentation, etc.).

In view of this herculean task, China could be lent a helping hand by its Pakistani and Turkish partners who each have a self-interested desire to this end, with Islamabad slated to patrol CPEC’s Sea Lines Of Communication (SLOC) with East Africa while Ankara is already a heavy hitter in Africa because of its recent embassy and airline expansion in the continent. Moreover, both of these countries are leaders of the international Muslim community (“Ummah”) in their own way and accordingly have soft power advantages over China in the majority-Muslim states of sub-Saharan Africa through which Beijing’s grand Silk Road projects will traverse. Seeing as how Pakistan and Turkey are also on very close relations with China, the scenario arises whereby these Great Powers enter into a trilateral working group with one another for effectively promoting their African policies through joint investments, socio-cultural initiatives, and the collective strengthening of Nigeria, Chad, and Sudan’s military capacities in countering their respective Hybrid War threats.

This is especially relevant when considering that all three transit states aren’t exactly on positive footing with the US. Washington initially refused to provide anti-terrorist assistance to Abuja when it first requested such against Boko Haram in 2014, and the Trump Administration has inexplicably placed N’Djamena on its travel ban list. As for Khartoum, it’s been under US sanctions for over two decades now, even though the State Department partially lifted some of them last month as part of its “carrots-and-sticks diplomacy” towards the country. Therefore, the case can convincingly be argued that these three African countries would be receptive to Chinese, Pakistani, and Turkish military assistance because their prospective Eurasian security partners are perceived of as being much more reliable and trusted than the Americans or French who always attach some sort of strings to their support. The only expectation that those three extra-regional states would have is that their counterparts’ collective stability would be enduring enough to facilitate win-win trade for everyone.

There’s a certain logic to the comprehensive strategy behind this Hexagonal Afro-Eurasian Partnership between Nigeria, Chad, Sudan, Turkey, Pakistan, and China. Nigeria, as the West African anchor state, could help expeditiously funnel the region’s overland trade to the Red Sea via the landlocked Chadian transit state and the maritime Sudanese one, thus making Khartoum the continental “gatekeeper” of West African-Chinese trade. Turkey’s hefty investments and newfound presence in Africa could help to “lubricate” this corridor by making it more efficient, with President Erdogan trumpeting his country’s version of a moderate “Muslim Democracy” at home in order to score significant soft power points with these three majority-Muslim African states and their elites. Pakistan would assist in this vision by providing security between Port Sudan and what might by that point be its twinned sister port of Gwadar in essentially enabling the flow of West Africa trade to China by means of CPEC.

Altogether, maritime threats are kept to a minimum because of the shortened SLOC between Sudan and Pakistan (as opposed to Nigeria and China) while the mainland ones are manageable due to the military-security dimensions of the proposed Hexagonal Afro-Eurasian Partnership, but it nevertheless shouldn’t be forgotten that Sudan and Pakistan are the crucial mainland-maritime interfaces for this transcontinental and pan-hemispheric Silk Road strategy which is expected to form the basis of China’s “South-South” integration in the emerging Multipolar World Order.

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 Nigerian Water Min. Adamu, Announces 21 dams, irrigation projects by 2019

 Grace Obike, The Nation, Abuja, November 11, 2017

Apart from the Gurara hydropower plant, Kashimbila hydropower plant, Gurara II, Lokoja and Dasin hausa, which has either been completed, about to be completed or in talks with potential investors. The Federal Government is poised to complete seven other ongoing water supply projects and twenty one dams and irrigation projects between 2018 and 2019.

FG is also in advanced discussions with potential investors for the Gurara II, Lokoja and Dasin hausa hydropower projects, which when completed will produce a combined 1,250MW electricity to the national grid. Minister of Water Resources, Engr. Suleiman Adamu made this disclosure in Abuja, while presenting the two years score card of his ministry. He added that at his resumption of office, his ministry agreed to prioritize the 116 uncompleted or abandoned major projects he had met and deploy resources towards completing and commissioning all high and medium priority projects from 2016 to 2019.

His words.” We have concluded a Technical Audit and prioritized. the hitherto uncompleted or abandoned 116 major projects that I met in the Ministry. We are deploying most of our resources towards completing and commissioning all the high and medium priority projects from 2016 – 2019. It is in this regard that we have completed and commissioned Central Ogbia Regional Water Supply Project in Bayelsa State. It is also my pleasure to inform this gathering that the following projects have also been completed and are ready for commissioning: “Northern Ishan Regional Water Supply Project, Edo State.

 We have concluded a Technical Audit and prioritized. the hitherto uncompleted or abandoned 116 major projects that I met in the Ministry. We are deploying most of our resources towards completing and commissioning all the high and medium priority projects from 2016 – 2019. It is in this regard that we have completed and commissioned Central Ogbia Regional Water Supply Project in Bayelsa State. It is also my pleasure to inform this gathering that the following projects have also been completed and are ready for commissioning: “Northern Ishan Regional Water Supply Project, Edo State rehabilitation of Ojirami Dam Water Supply Project, Edo State. Kashimbiia Dam, Taraba State. Ogwashi-Uku Dam, Delta State. “Two (2) other projects: Shagari and Barikin Ladi Irrigation Projects will be completed in early 2018.

Our plan is to complete 7 other ongoing Water Supply Projects and 21 Dam and Irrigation Projects between 2018 and 2019, including the following: Water Supply Projects, Inyishi Water Supply Project, Ekeremor Water Supply Project, Sabke/Dutsi/Mashi Water Supply Projects, Zobe Water Supply Project, Mangu Water Supply Project. “Dam & Irritation Projects. Middle Ogun Irrigation Project, Middle Rima Valley Irrigation Project, Gari Irrigation Project, Kontagora Auna Dam Project, Bagwai Irrigation Project,Tada Shonga Irrigation Project, Adani Rice Irrigation Project, Ekuku Dam Project, Lower Anambra Irrigation Project, Ile-Ife Dam Project, Zauro Polder Irrigation Project and Otukpo Multipurpose Dam Project. ” Our Roadmap identified Dams with Hydro Power potential for Development and we have been in collaboration with the Federal Ministry of Works, Power and Housing (FMWPH) to that effect. “We are currently making progress for the concessioning of the 30MW Gurara Hydropower plant which is planned to come into full operation by mid 2018. We are also progressing on our collaboration with FMWPH to concession the 40MW Kashimbila Hydropower Plant recently completed. In addition, we are in advanced discussions with potential investors for other hydropower projects including Gurara II (350MW), Lokoja (750MW) and Basin Hausa (150MW).

“With 1,800m3/Capita/year of available renewable water resources, Nigeria is not a water poor country.

“The Ministry has also championed the signing of an MOU between the Lake Chad Basin Commission and a Chinese company, who are presently undertaking further feasibility study on the proposed Interbasin Water Transfer Project from the Congo River into the Lake Chad. Furthermore, in an effort to arrive at the best solution in saving the Lake Chad, an International Conference on the Lake is now scheduled to hold in Abuja from 26th -28tln February, 2018 in collaboration with LCBC and UNESCO. “In addition, the Ministry has completed the engineering design and is set to commence in 2018 the Hawal InterBasin Transfer from River Hawal to River Ngadda. Phase 1 of the project is to augment water supply to Alau Dam so as to provide more sustainable source of water supply to Maiduguri and environs. Phase 2 of the project aims to resuscitate the 60,000Ha South Chad Irrigation Scheme, which became moribund following continuous drying up of Lake Chad over the years.”

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Trans-Saharan Railway Progressing: Great News for Africa

This rail project is vital not only for Sudan, but for the African continent. Sudan is located strategically to be the nexus for the East-West and North-South rail roads that when completed would transform the entire African landmass. Imagine the revolution in economic development when the Atlantic and Indian Oceans are connected across the girth of Africa, and also linked to the Mediterranean Sea and oceans surrounding South Africa. Port Sudan and Kenya’s port of Mombassa are part of China’s Maritime Silk Road. Ethiopia and Kenya have completed new rail lines with the assistance of China as part of the Spirit of the New Silk Road. Most people cannot even dream of how life for over one billion Africans would be changed by an industrialized and connected Africa, Yet, not only is it possible, but we can make it happen.

China signs agreement to begin planning 3,400km trans-Saharan railway

8 November 2017 |

By Global Construction Review Staff

Two Chinese companies will start planning a railway across the Sahara Desert linking Sudan’s Red Sea coast to landlocked Chad after an agreement was signed yesterday with the Sudanese government.

China Railway Design Corporation (CRDC) and China Friendship Development International Engineering Design & Consultation Company (FDDC) inked the deal with the Sudanese Railways Authority.

They now have 12 months to complete a feasibility study on the construction of the 3,400 kilometre-long railway from Port Sudan to the Chadian capital of N’Djamena.

Makawi Mohamed Awad, Sudan’s minister of transport, said that his ministry’s strategic aim was to link Port Sudan with all its landlocked neighbors. The Chad line, from its capital, N’Djamena, would join Sudan’s network at Nyala across the border. 
 

The Chad line would join Sudan’s network at Nyala, state capital of South Darfur

Plans for a Sahara railway go back some years.

In 2014, Sudan reached a political agreement with Chad to link their capitals with Port Sudan with a later extension to the Atlantic Ocean ports of Cameroon. Although both countries pledged to stop supporting each other’s rebel movements, continual instability delayed implementation. 

Further back in March 2012, Chad reached agreement with the China Civil Engineering Construction Corporation to build its portion of the line to the Sudanese border, after which it would join the Sudanese system at Nyala. The estimated $5.6bn cost of the line was thought likely be met by the Import Export Bank of China. 

The lines are to be built to standard gauge and will be allow trains to run at 120 km/h.

CRDC carries out preparatory work for railway construction. It has been a major player in the development of China’s domestic high-speed system, surveying some 7,500km of it. 

FDDC is a state-owned developer that carries out turnkey infrastructure projects outside the domestic market. 

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Federal Government of Nigeria to complete 21 other dams, irrigation projects by 2019

Grace Obike, The Nation, Abuja, November 11, 2017

Apart from the Gurara hydropower plant, Kashimbila hydropower plant, Gurara II, Lokoja and Dasin hausa, which has either been completed, about to be completed or in talks with potential investors. The Federal Government is poised to complete seven other ongoing water supply projects and twenty one dams and irrigation projects between 2018 and 2019.

FG is also in advanced discussions with potential investors for the Gurara II, Lokoja and Dasin hausa hydropower projects, which when completed will produce a combined 1,250MW electricity to the national grid. Minister of Water Resources, Engr. Suleiman Adamu made this disclosure in Abuja, while presenting the two years score card of his ministry. He added that at his resumption of office, his ministry agreed to prioritize the 116 uncompleted or abandoned major projects he had met and deploy resources towards completing and commissioning all high and medium priority projects from 2016 to 2019.

His words.” We have concluded a Technical Audit and prioritized. the hitherto uncompleted or abandoned 116 major projects that I met in the Ministry. We are deploying most of our resources towards completing and commissioning all the high and medium priority projects from 2016 – 2019. It is in this regard that we have completed and commissioned Central Ogbia Regional Water Supply Project in Bayelsa State. It is also my pleasure to inform this gathering that the following projects have also been completed and are ready for commissioning: “Northern Ishan Regional Water Supply Project, Edo State.

 We have concluded a Technical Audit and prioritized. the hitherto uncompleted or abandoned 116 major projects that I met in the Ministry. We are deploying most of our resources towards completing and commissioning all the high and medium priority projects from 2016 – 2019. It is in this regard that we have completed and commissioned Central Ogbia Regional Water Supply Project in Bayelsa State. It is also my pleasure to inform this gathering that the following projects have also been completed and are ready for commissioning: “Northern Ishan Regional Water Supply Project, Edo State rehabilitation of Ojirami Dam Water Supply Project, Edo State. Kashimbiia Dam, Taraba State. Ogwashi-Uku Dam, Delta State. “Two (2) other projects: Shagari and Barikin Ladi Irrigation Projects will be completed in early 2018.

Our plan is to complete 7 other ongoing Water Supply Projects and 21 Dam and Irrigation Projects between 2018 and 2019, including the following: Water Supply Projects, Inyishi Water Supply Project, Ekeremor Water Supply Project, Sabke/Dutsi/Mashi Water Supply Projects, Zobe Water Supply Project, Mangu Water Supply Project. “Dam & Irritation Projects. Middle Ogun Irrigation Project, Middle Rima Valley Irrigation Project, Gari Irrigation Project, Kontagora Auna Dam Project, Bagwai Irrigation Project,Tada Shonga Irrigation Project, Adani Rice Irrigation Project, Ekuku Dam Project, Lower Anambra Irrigation Project, Ile-Ife Dam Project, Zauro Polder Irrigation Project and Otukpo Multipurpose Dam Project. ” Our Roadmap identified Dams with Hydro Power potential for Development and we have been in collaboration with the Federal Ministry of Works, Power and Housing (FMWPH) to that effect. “We are currently making progress for the concessioning of the 30MW Gurara Hydropower plant which is planned to come into full operation by mid 2018. We are also progressing on our collaboration with FMWPH to concession the 40MW Kashimbila Hydropower Plant recently completed. In addition, we are in advanced discussions with potential investors for other hydropower projects including Gurara II (350MW), Lokoja (750MW) and Basin Hausa (150MW).

“With 1,800m3/Capita/year of available renewable water resources, Nigeria is not a water poor country.

“The Ministry has also championed the signing of an MOU between the Lake Chad Basin Commission and a Chinese company, who are presently undertaking further feasibility study on the proposed Interbasin Water Transfer Project from the Congo River into the Lake Chad. Furthermore, in an effort to arrive at the best solution in saving the Lake Chad, an International Conference on the Lake is now scheduled to hold in Abuja from 26th -28tln February, 2018 in collaboration with LCBC and UNESCO. “In addition, the Ministry has completed the engineering design and is set to commence in 2018 the Hawal InterBasin Transfer from River Hawal to River Ngadda. Phase 1 of the project is to augment water supply to Alau Dam so as to provide more sustainable source of water supply to Maiduguri and environs. Phase 2 of the project aims to resuscitate the 60,000Ha South Chad Irrigation Scheme, which became moribund following continuous drying up of Lake Chad over the years.”

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 Africa On The Move for Energy: Nuclear and Hydro

July 24, 2017

“Nuclear Is the Future of Africa”

          Russia’s Rosatom nuclear industry organization has signed an MOU with the African Young Generation in Nuclear, a non-profit organization, which was initiated earlier this year in Kenya. Its mission is education, with the goal to bring youth across the continent into the nuclear industry.

          The MOU with Rosatom was signed during the three-day POWER-GEN & DistibuTECH Africa 2017 conference. Africa’s population is a predominantly young one, said Viktor Polikarpov from Rostaom, at the signing. “This is why we attach great importance to working with the young people who will implement and take further the nuclear programs we have laid the groundwork for,” he said. “Nuclear is the future of Africa.”

          Gaopalelwe Santswere, President of the African Young Generation in Nuclear, explained that the organization has a membership of over 350 professionals working in the nuclear power sector across Africa. “Africa is the new nuclear frontier,” he said, “and we are working to equip the continent’s young professionals with the skills they will need in this new environment.” Santswere said that his organization aims to formalize similar agreements with other industry organizations.

          Public education and youth recruitment to nuclear are key elements in defeating the aggressive mobilization by the financial mafia and their political shock troops out to try to destroy the only power-producing nuclear program on the continent, in South Africa, and prevent other African nations from going nuclear.

Power-Starved African Nations Move Ahead with Hydropower Projects

          After years of planning, Nigeria has begun construction of the 3,050 MW Mambilla hydropower project located on the Donga River in eastern Nigeria, forming its border with Cameroon. The Donga arises from the Mambilla Plateau in eastern Nigeria and flows northwest to merge with the Benue River in Nigeria. Two Chinese firms, Gezhouba Construction Group Corp. (CGGC), and the Sinohydro Corp. will be handling the engineering, procurement and construction contract.

          Nigeria’s Minister of Power Babatunde Fashola said earlier this week that the government expects the plant to be complete in 2024. Mambilla is one of four hydropower projects Fashola called on the country to expedite last year. The others are the 700-MW Zungeru, 250-MW Gurara, and 35-MW Dadin Kowa — all of which Nigeria wants to see inaugurated within the next decade, Hydroworld reported.

          Also, the Hydoworld reported that in late-June Ivory Coast has commissioned the 275 MW Soubre hydroelectric power station. The station, located at Naoua Falls on the Sassandra River near the city of Soubre, in southwestern Ivory Coast, will cost about $570 million. It was developed by Power Construction Corp. of China (Power China). China’s Sinohydro Corp. Ltd. constructed the project, which was 85% financed by Export-Import Bank of China and 15% by Ivory Coast, {Global Times} reported.

          Power China said work on the project began in February 2013 and the project’s 4.5 km long Soubre Dam is the largest of its kind in the West African country. The project is expected to annually generate about 1,190 GWh and provide 90% of the country’s electricity, Hydroworld wrote.

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We Can Prevent Famine from Killing Millions of Africans

Lawrence Freeman
March 17, 2017
 
Famine is stalking Africa, threatening unprecedented levels of starvation. Famine has already been officially declared in parts of South Sudan’s Unity State, Somalia, and sections of the Borno State in Nigeria. Somalian officials reported 110 human beings perished from hunger in forty-eight hours in one region in the first days of March. One cannot imagine how parents cope watching their children slowly, painfully expire. Famine in Africa is not only unconscionable, but a crime against humanity, because it can be prevented. Only through an entirely new paradigm, that eliminates poverty through infrastructure led development, which can and must be done, will death by starvation finally be eradicated from the entire continent. In over 30 years China has lifted 750 million of its people out of poverty, and has pledged to help Africa eliminate poverty from its vast continent as well. Nothing less than this is acceptable. What is urgently required is; intention and vision for a better future.

 A Partial Overview
 
The United Nations humanitarian chief Stephen O’Brien told the UN Security Council that the world faces the largest humanitarian crisis since the United Nations was founded in 1945. More than 20 million people in four countries are facing starvation and famine, O’Brien said, and that “without collective and coordinated global efforts, people will simply starve to
death” and “many more will suffer and die from disease.” The four nations facing immediate catastrophe are; Yemen, South Sudan, Somalia, and northeast Nigeria.
The Africa Center for Strategic Studies reports that nineteen African countries are facing crisis, emergency, or catastrophic levels of food insecurity. This includes 17 million people in the Horn of Africa; Somalia, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, South Sudan, Sudan, and Uganda, and millions more in Central African Republic, Cameroon, Zimbabwe, Malawi, and Mozambique are also in danger of acute food insecurity.
According to international food organizations, famine is declared if more than 30% of the population is acutely malnourished;  one in five households within a vicinity face extreme food shortages; and two or more people or four children die per 10,000 daily.
 
*Somalia
Of its 6.2 million population, more than half are in need of aid, with 2.9 million requiring immediate assistance, and 270,000 children suffering acute malnutrition. Somalia has suffered two consecutive years of drought. In the 2011 famine, Somalia lost 260,000 people; over half were children under the age of five.  Many experts fear that unless immediate action is taken there is the potential of a full blown famine, possibly exceeding the 2011 death totals.
 
*South Sudan
As this poor landlocked nation is approaching its sixth anniversary of independence, its living conditions are horrific. The UN reports: almost 5 million people- 40% of the population are in desperate need of food; and 100,000 people in Unity State are presently struggling to survive the reality of famine. UNICEF reports that 1 million children are estimated to be acutely malnourished, and 270,000 children are suffering from severe malnutrition.
 
 Northeast Nigeria and the Lake Chad Basin
In the four nations of Lake Chad Basin; Nigeria, Chad, Niger, and Cameroon, the UN estimates that 10.7 million people require assistance, with 7.1 million categorized as food insecure. In the Northeastern Nigerian states of Borno, Adamawa, and Yobe, the UN reports that 400,000 children are at risk of from famine, with 75,000-90,000 facing immediate danger of dying from hunger.
 
          Humanitarian Aid Is Insufficient
 
          To avert the further spread of famine, UN Secretary General of the United Nations António Guterres has requested upwards $5.6 billion, with a majority of the funds needed as soon as the end of March, the New York Times reported. Guiterees also appealed for $825 million in aid to address drought and cholera in Somalia. So far only a small portion of these goals have been met.
          In response to drought, famine, and other disasters, emergency aid is necessary to save lives, and is a moral responsibility. However, we must have the courage to admit to ourselves that simply providing aid is an inadequate response by the UN and international community. Yes, many of these nations suffer from the interrelationship of civil strife, and famine. A paramount underlying cause of both is the inability to provide the basic necessities of life due to severe underdevelopment of their economies. This essential and fundamental truth has been overlooked or deliberately ignored for over five decades, until the recent extension of China’s Silk Road onto the African continent.
In the years following the “Winds of Change” as African nations freed themselves from the yoke of colonialism, many became food self sufficient or nearly so due to abundant fertile soil. Objectively, there is no justifiable reason for hunger to exist anywhere in Africa. Given the large areas of uncultivated, but arable land available in Africa (the most abundant on the planet), Africa not only has the potential to feed its own expanding population, but also become a net food exporter to Asia. Thus to die from hunger is not only criminally immoral, but actually “un-African” at its roots. The not so secret missing ingredient for Africa to achieve its agricultural potential is: physical economic development of vital infrastructure.
 
          What is Actually Required to Prevent Famine
 
 All functioning, i.e. growing economies depend on a platform of integrated infrastructure especially in categories of rail, energy, roads, and water projects, because of their essential, irreplaceable contribution in raising the productivity of the labor force. It has been the failure of Western institutions to assist the emerging nations of Africa in securing the necessary infrastructure across the continent that is the long term cause for the crisis that African nations face today. Some may object to such an analysis, but history has proved that it is the long waves of policy that shape the present and the future. After suffering hundreds of years of slavery that ripped the social fabric of the continent apart and tortured the cultural soul of Africa, it was followed by another century of brutal-exploitive colonialism. The best form of justice would have been to assist these newly formed nations in becoming economically sovereign. Presidents Franklin Roosevelt and Kennedy had this vision, but tragically it was not shared by other leaders.
Lack of economic growth has a great deal to do with ethnic warfare and the spread of terrorism. Poor people, reaching to find enough water, food, and land for the very survival of themselves and their loved ones become desperate, and desperate people become victims of manipulation in violent conflicts, as well as easy recruits to extremist groups. Economic growth that provides the citizens with means to exist, and hope for a better future, is the great “mitigator” against desperation and alienation that leads to violence.
So far mankind has not been able to prevent draughts, but mankind can prevent draughts from causing famine. How? With infrastructure, nations can mitigate the deadly effects of draughts; by utilizing irrigation, and water management projects, generating sufficient energy to pump water; railroads for transporting food to the needy from other parts of the state and from other countries not as severely affected, and by creating integrated industrial–agricultural sectors capable of producing a surplus of food.
Can one deny that the extreme poverty rampant throughout the nations of the Lake Chad Basin is not a major factor for the spread of Boko Haram? Can anyone deny that the paucity of electrical power for Nigeria’s 190 million people along with sky high rates of youth unemployment are not contributing factors to the multifaceted crisis in north-east Nigeria? Was it not patently obvious that the creation of the new nation of South Sudan without first establishing a stable economy providing the basic needs for its people, especially food, was at serious risk from the beginning?
For example, had the East-West railroad, connecting the Horn of Africa along the Gulf of Eden and Indian Ocean across West Africa to the Atlantic Ocean been built Africa would have achieved new levels of economic growth for all the nations involved. A similar effect would have occurred, had the South–North railroad along African’s eastern spine had been developed. If the great inter-basin water transfer project known as Transaqua, capable of transferring billions of cubic feet of water from the Congo River Basin to Lake Chad, while creating an economic corridor between the nations of the Great Lakes and the Lake Chad Basin, been built thirty years ago when it was first proposed, how much suffering and death could have been prevented. Finally, in December 2016, ChinaPower signed an agreement with Nigeria for a feasibility study on a portion of the long overdue Transaqua project.
 
A New Opportunity to End Famine and War
 
In this century, infrastructure projects are being built across the African continent for the first time, as an extension of China’s Silk Road and Maritime Silk Road policy, also known as the Belt and Road Initiative-BRI. China is collaborating with African nations to build railroads at a rate never seen before on the continent. Discussing the importance of railway development, the Chinese Minister of Commerce recently stated: “Africa is an important part of the One Belt rail initiative.” China’s five biggest foreign railroad projects are in Africa.  Premier Li Keqiang announced China’s intention to help Africa connect all its capital cities by modern rail lines. What effect will this have on the economies of Africa? Nothing short of an economic revolution spurring unprecedented levels of trade and commerce!
As the expression says, China is putting its money where its mouth is, when the West has firmly rejected financing any significant investment in infrastructure for Africa.  Between 2000 and 2014 China made $24.2 billion in loans to finance transportation projects in Africa, according to the China Africa Research Initiative-(CARI). China financed the recently completed Addis Ababa, Ethiopia to Djibouti electrified train at $4 billon. China will provide $13 billion to finance construction of the Standard Gauge Railroad-(SGR) in Kenya. The first phase of a rail line for passengers and freight from Mbassa, the largest port in Africa to Nairobi, Kenya’s capital and further north to the major market in Naivasha is to be completed by the end of this year. The Horn of Africa will be transformed as the SGR is extended to the capitals of Kenya’s five neighboring states; South Sudan, Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi, and Tanzania. The longer term vision is for the Addis Ababa to Djibouti rail line and the SGR to become eastern part of the East-West railroad.
With Chinese financing and Chinese construction companies, Nigeria is building a standard rail gauge from Lagos to Kano for $7.5 billion with stops in Ibaden, llorin, Mina, and Kaduna. China has signed an agreement with Nigeria for $12 billion to construct a coastal rail line from Lagos to Calabar. China has also financed the light rail system in Addis Ababa, and light rail lines in Nigeria’s capital Abuja, and its former capital and largest city, Lagos. China has already financed $22 billion in infrastructure projects in Nigeria, with another $23 billion on going, and $40 billion more are in the pipeline according to Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi, when he spoke last month in Abuja. For Nigeria, a country filled with mega cities inhabited by its huge and expanding population, rail transportation is a game changer.
          In addition to funding rail construction, Chinese companies are involved in other important infrastructure across the continent, including new ports, highways, and airports, reaping $50 billion a year on their investments reports CARI.
           Aboubaker Omar Hadi, chairman of the Djibouti Ports and Free Zone Authority stated bluntly: “We approached the U.S., and they didn’t have the vision. They are not thinking ahead 30 years. They only have a vision from the past as a continent of war and famine. The Chinese have vision.”
It should be emphasized that these rail projects along with other infrastructure projects being built and financed by China will generate hundreds of thousands of skilled jobs for Africa’s unemployed.
 
It is vital that the Chinese Silk Road take up the task of creating electrical power for Africa. A mere 100,000 megawatts of electrical power for the sub-Saharan population of almost one billion, is literally a death sentence for Africa. Without hundreds of thousands of additional megawatts of power, Africa’s future; its very existence is in jeopardy. While the West is infatuated with off grid, lower technologies like wind and solar; construction of hundreds of nuclear power plants, which offer the best and most reliable form of energy is the next challenge. If the expansion of nuclear power follows the rate of growth of rail development, then famine, abject poverty, and war will become a distant memory of the past.  If the new Washington administration breaks from previous US policy, and decides to collaborate with China with its “win-win” approach for all nations to join the Silk Road, then the long overdue industrialization of Africa is eminently feasible. 
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Ethiopia’s Economic Growth Model Become A Template for Africa Despite the World Bank’s Objection?

By Lawrence Freeman

June 4, 2016

            Contrary to the obsessive fixation by the West concerning human rights violations by the government of Ethiopia, the most fundamental human right is: the right to live.  Similar to China that has lifted 500 million of its citizens out of poverty over the last three decades, Ethiopia has reduced the number of people living in poverty by one third over the last decade, from 38.7% of the population in 2004 to 26% in 2014.  In neither country was it accomplished by accident, but rather by intention through government directed policies, which recognized the critical role of the state in fostering economic growth, especially in supporting infrastructure projects in vital categories of water, energy, roads, and rail development. In the case of Ethiopia, this is the result of the of the intellectual leadership of now deceased Prime Minister, Meles Zenawi, who developed the concept of the “Developmental State” to secure his nation’s economic future as opposed to relying on the so called freedom of the market place. Ethiopia, the second most populated nation in sub-Saharan Africa approaching 100 million people, is on a unique path of growth as a result of successful state interventionist polices. While it cannot be denied that poverty exist, Zenawi and his legacy have changed more than the direction of Ethiopia, they have changed the actually the dynamic of the economy that even Ethiopia’s detractors have begrudgingly been compelled to acknowledge.

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Ethiopia’s Top Priority: Eliminate Poverty And Backwardness

Lawrence Freeman and Donielle DeToy

December 8, 2014

   Ethiopia, the most populous landlocked country in the world, with over 93 million people, lacking abundant precious metals and other high priced resources, has made the development of its people, its most valuable resource, the primary focus of its policies. Bereket Simon, a valued adviser to Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn, emphasized in discussions with EIR the importance of the government’s role in improving its economy; reversing low productivity, and advancing the livelihoods of its citizens, by strengthening employment in the formal economy over the backward informal sector.

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The Nile Basin: Egypt’s Role in Africa’s Development

Hussein Askary and Dean Andromidas, Part III

October 10, 2014

In almost all academic papers and reports by international organizations, including the UN, water is treated as a closed system, with a finite amount of water and limited potential for development. The linear measurements of the water and land resources exclude creative, noetic human intervention, in the form of technology to transform these resources and multiply their effect. On the contrary, humans, whose growth in numbers and needs is not linear but geometrical, are considered a burden on the natural resources that are growing arithmetically, to cite the British Empire’s genocide theorist Thomas Malthus. This is reflected, often subconsciously, in many “scientific” papers presented in conferences concerning water issues in the world, to which this author has been a witness.

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Peace Through Development Could Have Prevented Collapse of South Sudan

Lawrence Freeman

February 14, 2014

     Given the level of violent conflict that has engulfed South Sudan, when fighting broke out on the evening of Dec. 15, 2013, bringing the world’s newest nation to the brink of civil war, why is a presentation of Dr. Lual A. Deng’s idea of “peace through development” for South Sudan and its northern neighbor Sudan, timely and necessary?
     His unique proposal of creating a new geometry of peaceful relations between the two Sudans, emanating from a zone of economic development among the ten states along their common border, is exactly the kind “out-of-the box,”non-practical thinking required

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Ethiopian Dam: Development Not Hunger for East Africa

Mulugeta Zewdie Michael

November 25, 2013

I thank the organizers who created an opportunity for me to present here, in the framework of big projects that could change the status of the world economy, to give as an example, the “Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam” project. Before that, I just want to give you some background, of why we came to the conclusion of constructing the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam on the Nile River.

Ethiopia’s long-term potential for exploitable energy is estimated at about 60,000 MW, with hydro-power
providing 45,000 MW; geothermal, 10,000 MW; and wind and other energy sources, some 5,000 MW. However, of the 45,000 MW hydropower potential, Ethiopia has so far used only 2,000 MW. Now, you can imagine the potential that could have, to bring us out of poverty in Ethiopia.

It is public knowledge, what Ethiopia looked like some 20 years ago, and what it looks like now. We speak about a new Ethiopia, now, on the basis of the economic policy we have followed. We have accomplished, for example, that Ethiopia has registered, for the last eight years, consecutively, an average of 11% economic growth. And we believe that such projects, again, will bring us into a bright future, where we can save also the next generation

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Impoverished Mali Can Become A Bread Basket of the Sahel

Lawrence Freeman

July 12, 2013

      There is a genuine desire by the Malian people to have their Presidential election on July 28, their first since the March 2012 coup d’état destabilized their country, and since the war against the jihadist invasion in the north. If this month’s vote is successfully completed, the underlying issues that led to the crisis in Mali will still have to be addressed. A long-term strategic vision for the country, and for the entire Sahel, is desperately needed, to lift up this impoverished region, which is suffering from an extreme lack of development in basic infrastructure, especially in the critical areas of energy and transportation.

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 Africa Needs Transformative Infrastructure Projects  to Stop Genocide of Its People                                             

Africa’s Great Deficit: Challenges of Infrastructure Decay, Development

With the creation of the Organization of Africa Unity by thirty-two African signatories on May 25, 1963, there was a sense of optimism in Africa and the world, which corresponded with election two and half  years earlier of the pro-African President, John F Kennedy, an adherent of President Franklin Roosevelt. A mere six months later President Kennedy was assassinated, which began a long wave of pessimism, and decline, especially in the US, from which we have never recovered.

As the OAU transitioned into the African Union in the early years of this century, its focus shifted away from liberation wars against colonialism to an emphasis on “Africa’s development and integration.” The vision of the AU is for: “An integrated prosperous and peaceful Africa, driven by its own citizens and representing a dynamic force in the global arena.” (AU website) The New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD) adopted by both the OAU and AU, emerged from the struggle of 1970s and 1980s and: “Faced  with the onset of an economic crisis-huge foreign debts and declines in social development-and the  failure of the international financial institutions’ free market polices, African countries  tried to reverse these trends by calling for a new international economic order (NIEO) through which they could craft self-reliant, culturally relevant and state-influenced development strategies.” (http://www.nepad.org)

Unfortunately this vision has not been realized, and African nations today are still controlled from the outside by the tentacles of those same those financial institutions that reside in the City of London.

Speaking truthfully, I can tell you that African nations will never develop their full potential, achieve true economic sovereignty, and end the continued suffering of their citizens, until the power of these financier-predators is broken, and a new radical transformation in long term strategic economic thinking for Africa and the world is brought into being. The development of African nations have been deliberately suppressed initially during the colonial period, and following the “Winds of Change,” by neo-colonial practices that have accomplished the same desired result: the looting of the continent’s abundant resources under the ground, accompanied by the killing of tens of millions of “natives” above the ground. That is how Lord Cecil Rhodes described British Imperial policy over a century ago, and sadly these polices have not changed today, only their form.

The two chief mechanisms used to achieve these desired ends have been: 1) the intentional refusal to build regional and trans-continental infrastructure projects in vital categories of power, water, and rail transportation; and 2) the manipulation, creation, and nurturing of “ethnic-religious’ differences. The intended consequence has been fragile or weakened states throughout all regions of the continent. Suffering from the lack of the basic necessities of life, desperate people, predictably turn on each other; fighting and killing their brothers and sisters over food, land, and water, simply to stay alive. We witness these conditions today in Sudan and South Sudan, the Central African Republic, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Nigeria, and Mali.

Conflicts, wars, famine, and the rise of insurgency, will continue until their root causes are extirpated, and replaced by a new economic system committed to growth and progress.

What Is Wealth?

It has become the latest popular fad, rampant in western capitals, to fraudulently claim that six of the fastest growing countries in the world are in Africa. I say bunk!  Look at what are they measuring and the fallacy is obvious.  The problem is popular opinion; the belief that money has intrinsic wealth, and therefore everything can be measured in money related values.

Take Nigeria for example, which is reported to have one of highest rates of growth over the first decade of this century according to statistics from the International Monetary Fund. What is the IMF measuring? Not the real growth of economy. Instead it is simply adding up monetary statistical price-values of various sectors, such as; oil, banking-finance, housing, the stock exchange, and who can forget, cell phones. Lyndon LaRouche, the founder of Executive Intelligence Review has insisted on the fundamental distinction between financial-money values and real physical wealth. When we measure the progress of an economy over time, we look at values of physical production per capita and per land area. For example, what is the real economy of Nigeria?

We should examine: food consumption per capita and food production per square kilometer of land; electrical power per capita, per square kilometer, and total megawatt output; total kilometers of rail lines relative to the total land area. The same type of measurements can be done with production levels of steel, turbines, tractors, etc. Next we measure the rate of change of these categories of physical production from one production cycle to the next, with special attention to the levels of capital intensity and energy flux density-(the power of your energy source) employed in the production process.

Once we look at physical wealth per capita per land area, we see why Nigeria is in its current condition: over 100 million people trying to live on 1-2 dollars a day; a measly 4000 megawatts of power for almost 170 million people; imports of basic food such as wheat, rice, fish and sugar, growing at 11% annually. And, it was just in March of this year, that Nigeria finally has an operational rail line between two key cities-Lagos and Kano-even if at only at 20-30 miles per our.

So what is actually growing; financialvalues, not the real physical economy. It should be obvious why financial-monetary statistics are not only wrong, but are worse than useless in forecasting the future of any economy. This was highlighted by the IMF’s 2010 report of Tunisia’s economy, praising it as a great model, months before it was overthrown by a population demanding jobs and food.

Credit Verses Money

Mr. LaRouche has advocated for decades to replace the post 1971 floating-rate exchange money system we have today with a Hamiltonian credit system, named after the revolutionary proposals by President George Washington’s first Secretary of the Treasury, Alexander Hamilton, who created the First National Bank of the US in 1791

There is a fundamental difference in principle between money and credit; they are two different and distinct species, so to speak. While most people have become obsessed with the amount of money they can possess in their greedy little hand in the present moment, the principle of credit takes one into the realm of the future. Credit as opposed to money is extended for the creation of new-augmented wealth above what already is consumed in the present.

To understand the most elementary notion of credit, look at the production of food by the farmer. When the farmer is provided with adequate infrastructure and credit, he works to grow more food, whose value is above and beyond the costs that went into producing that crop. The creation of credit for the purchase of  land, fertilizer, seed, and capital equipment are essential features of Hamilton’s American System of economics, which will successfully increase food production when not sabotaged financial interest of the City of London.

It is immoral and without any justification to allow millions of people on this planet, especially in Africa with its fertile soil, to suffer from starvation and food insecurity, when mankind knows how to grow food. Nations’ agriculture sectors have been destroyed over the last two decades or more by the evils of globalization in the name of free-trade. African courtiers approached self sufficiency in feeding their people from their own land and labor through the 1960s and 1970s, even into the early 1980s. The combination of globalization which demands buying food at the cheapest prices and the World Trade Organization’s liberal mantra, not to interfere with the so called free-markets has caused people to die and suffer needlessly. It has been proven again and again, that when governments provide adequate amounts of credit and subsides to their farmers, not only does food production increase dramatically, but the whole economy progresses.

We have seen famines and severe food shortages throughout the Horn of Africa that have resulted in the deaths of millions. This is a form of population reduction, caused by the deliberate refusal to develop the agricultural potential of countries. It has been known for decades that Sudan could and still can, be the bread basket for Africa, with studies showing that it has the potential to feed the entire continent-1 billion people. Now South Sudan has 58 million acres of quality arable land, yet a large portion of its 9 million people require food aid to survive, and it is forced to import 95% of its food. Why was there a complete fixation by the west to indict President Omar al-Bashir, and not the same commitment to develop this great untapped agricultural potential, decades ago? Isn’t it a crime against humanity; to let people die from starvation when we could have provided them with food?

Leadership Is Living In The Future

Intervention by the state to improve the output of its agricultural sector is not only a matter of national security, but is an obligation of the state to provide for a better future for its citizens.

As I discussed earlier, growth of an economy takes place in an entirely different domain, from one that is based on foolishly on simply adding up monetary aggregates. It is not money that improves an economy, but investments in all forms of hard and soft infrastructure that lead to an increase the productive powers of labor of that society to provide it current population and its posterity.

A nation dedicated to providing for its citizens and their posterity need leaders who live in the future. As opposed to Adam Smith’s so called indivisible hand, nations develop and progress by the willful intention to create a better, and more prosperous future, than exists in the present. That intention to create additional-new physical wealth over the next 10-20 year production cycle, to accommodate an expanding population and a rising per capita standard of living, is what must govern the decisions of the present. Mastering such a time-reversal concept is necessary for competent economic planning. Only when our mind lives in the imagination of the future can we truly understand how to organize our activities in the present

For long term, durable economic growth, we must also create a culture that will give birth to a continuous flow of discoveries of new scientific principles, which generate the technological advances required to continually transform the economy to the next higher level. Mr. LaRouche has revolutionized economic forecasting by identifying that the power to make these discoveries lies uniquely in the creativity of mankind. Each new child born is endowed by the Creator with the power of creative mentation, thus a source of potential new wealth for all of humanity.

       The truest definition of economic value, is that unit of action, generated from the creative mind of man, which transforms the productive powers of labor to cause an increase in the physical wealth of society measured in output per capita and per square kilometer.

The West Is Dying

When the long simmering fictitious-bubble financial system of the Trans-Atlantic nations exploded in 2007-2008, it was no longer possible to have any illusions, that the west, under the current bankrupt monetarist financial system would invest in Africa at the levels necessary to transform the continent.

The Euro Zone nations, stripped of their sovereignty are undergoing an accelerated contraction of their economies under the diktats of the Troika; the IMF, the European Central Bank, and the EU Commission. As a result of implementing these austerity measures European nations have experienced such a dramatic increase in the death rate; they have been characterized as being “Africanized.”

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[Graph of youth unemployment in Europe]

If you can see the graph it shows that from 2008-2012 youth unemployment in six European countries doubled. In Greece it increased from 22.1% in 2008 to 55.3% at the close of 2012. In Spain, youth unemployment increased from 24.6% to 53.2% in the same time period, and rose again in the first quarter of 2013. This is the result of implementing the Troika orders on behalf of trying to keep a bankrupt banking system alive, when it is already dead. These figures make abundantly clear, that the Europeans are experiencing youth unemployment at levels approaching what we have previously only witnessed in African nations, but are actually far worse, because they are happening in so called advanced sector urbanized nations.

What Must Be Done

Therefore, it is urgent that we have the immediate re-implementation of Glass Steagall as first passed into law by President Franklin Roosevelt in 1933. My organization has spearheaded a drive over several years for re-implementation of Glass Steagall. I am happy to report to you that on May 23, Senator Harkin from Iowa introduced S. 985 in the Senate, and that Marcy Kaptur from Ohio at the beginning of the year sponsored HR 129 with bi-partisan support in the House. This law separates the universal-gambling casino banks from the legitimate savings and commercial banks that serve the interest of sovereign nations. Once this law goes into effect, it will end all “bail-outs” and “bail-ins” that have cost taxpayers and depositors trillions of dollars to keep alive “the too big to fail banks” in the US and Europe.  Other countries will follow the US example, resulting in the bankrupting-wiping out of over one quadrillion dollars of debt, derivates-gambling debts, and other worthless securities, allowing nations the freedom to return to traditional-normal banking practices. The immediate passage of Glass Steagall is not just a good idea, but the only option available to stop the downward spiral of the world economy into complete destruction.

The second step accompanying a Glass Steagall law is the creation of Hamiltonian credit banks by every nation, to provide the credit for investment in agriculture, manufacturing, and other categories of production most especially in infrastructure.

The third feature of this program for progress is investment in transformative infrastructure projects.

To quote NEPAD: “There can be no meaningful development without trade and there can be no trade without adequate and meaningful infrastructure.”

However, I can say with confidence that the private sector will never

fund the quantity and quality of infrastructure projects Africa requires. It must and can only be done by public credit earmarked for productive purposes, not for paying off debts, or for speculation. I would recommend that African nations move as quickly as possible towards allocating 50% of their budgets on infrastructure

Let me conclude by presenting an idea of what the future can be. These are not pie in the sky fantasies or white elephants. These are a few great-regional and trans-continental transformative projects beyond what has been discussed by the AU and NEPAD that are exemplary of the great possibilities of development that lie ahead for mankind, if we chose to accept the challenge.

MAIN LINES OF WORLDWIDE RAIL NETWORK-A GLOBAL LANDBRIDGE Proposed by Mrs. Helga Zepp LaRouche in the EIR Special Report: “The Eurasian Land-Bridge; The New ‘Silk Road’-locomotive for worldwide economic development.” (January 1997)

MAIN LINES OF WORLDWIDE RAIL NETWORK-A GLOBAL LANDBRIDGE
Proposed by Mrs. Helga Zepp LaRouche in the EIR Special Report: “The Eurasian Land-Bridge; The New ‘Silk Road’-locomotive for worldwide economic development.” (January 1997)

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NAWAPA-North American Water and Power Alliance

Originally proposed in 1964 and revised by Lyndon LaRouche’s political action committee-“NAWAPAXXI” (2012 larouchepac.com)  

132 million acre feet of water from the northwest Pacific basin, will transform Canada, the US and Mexico, creating up to 12 million jobs, gigawatts of additional power, rail transportation across the US into Alaska, water management that will double irrigation in the US and Mexico, effecting a dramatic increase in food production and a total advance in the productivity of North America.

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TRANSAQUA

“The Congo-Chad Water Transfer: The Main Features of a Feasibility Study” (EIR Oct 8, 2010 pages 30-34)

This project; Transaqua: An Idea for the Sahel” was first proposed 1991-1992 by an Italian engineering firm, Bonifica, so it has been known for over two decades. The concept is simple; mankind intervenes to assist Mother Nature by transferring water from a wet region-the Congo Basin to a dry region-the Chad Basin, to improve human life and biosphere. The Congo River has 1.9 trillion cubic meters of water flowing out into the Atlantic annually. We can curtail about 5% of this discharge, 1 billion cubic meters, and build a navigable canal send it north to join the Obangui River, across Central Africa Republic, into River Chari, to refurbish Lake Chad. The CAR  would become an integrated river port, Lake Chad would expand instead of disappearing, effecting the lives of 50 million people, from Chad, Nigeria, Cameroon, and Niger, reversing the encroachment of the desert, over-all creating new possibilities for economic growth for the Sahel.

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 CANAL FROM EASTERN CONGO TO QATTARA DEPRESSION

EIR feature: “Program for an Economic Miracle in Southern Europe, The Mediterranean Region, And Africa.” (“Afro-Mediterranean Revolutionary Project” EIR June 8, 2012, pages 39-43)

This project proposed by Aiman Rsheed, in 2011. An irrigation canal 40 meters wide and 3,800 kilometers long flowing from the highlands of eastern Congo, with the Congo River flowing north through the CAR, Sudan, and South Sudan through Egypt to fill the Qattara Depression . This will transform the desert, increase agricultural and energy production.

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AFRICAN PASS TRANSPORT CORRIDOR

EIR feature (June 8, 2012, pages 39-43)

 

This rail project begins with a seaport Sidi Barrani in north-western Egypt, to be connected to Rwanda, Burundi, Uganda, DRC, the CAR, Sudan and South Sudan by high speed rails and highways, in the second phase extends to Somalia and Ethiopia, and in the third phase to Asia through a tunnel underneath the Suez Canal. The fourth phase includes a high speed rail across North Africa connecting to Europe through the planned Gibraltar tunnel.

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EAST-WEST RAIL ROAD-Dakar to Port Sudan

“Sudan Inaugurates Continental Railway.” (EIR, January 22, 2012, pages 9-14)

The Organization of the Islamic Conference is preparing to fund the Dakar-Port Sudan Railway Line of approximately 14,000 kilometers. The main line would link Sudan, Chad, Niger, Mali, and Senegal as the main east-west line, followed by additional branches to Djibouti, Libya, Uganda, Cameroon, Nigeria, Burkina Faso, and Guinea, revolutionizing transport, production, and trade across the girth of Africa.

Final Concluding Comment

Africa is reported to have the fastest growing youth population, ages 15-24, in the world, making up 20% of the total population of the continent or 200 million, and 60% of the unemployed. Construction of these infrastructure projects will not only be the most efficient way to provide employment for Africa’s “youth bulge,”  but it will necessitate the education and training of tens of millions of youth as laborers, engineers and scientists.  This course of action will provide a bright future for all Africans, and benefit the entire world. .

There is no solution to continent’s curse of insurgency, war, and weak states without economic progress measured in physical terms. The very task of completing these types of infrastructure projects, ones that encompass several countries working together provides these nations with a vision for the future. This common mission; economic development in the service of the common good of all people, constitutes a new dynamic of relations, that will serve as a unique platform to achieve true unity. The AU should dedicate itself to this mission above and beyond all else.

I am always reminded, if not guided by, what Pope Paul VI wrote in his encyclical, Populorum Progressio-on the development of peoples-that “Development is the New Name for Peace.” This was written in March 26, 1967, four years after the founding the OAU. The fulfillment of this mission is more imperative today than ever. So let’s get moving! We cannot have another anniversary, years from now, and still be discussing these projects for the future, but instead Africans should be enjoying the fruits of their labor.

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South  Sudan Could Feed Its People and Export Food

Lawrence Freeman

December 30, 2012

For the new Republic of South Sudan, the government must begin now to finally realize its agriculture potential, providing food not only to its own people, but also to its neighbors in the Horn of Africa and in the Maghreb to the north. This will not only require investments in essential infrastructure way beyond what is presently envisioned; it must include, above all else, the Republic of the Sudan (in the North) and the Republic of South Sudan each accepting the other as its most important ally, linked by shared economic development. “We need the

North as much as they need us,” says the Hon. Betty Achan Ogwaro, Agricultural Minister of the Republic of South Sudan (see Interview). And she is right!

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Interview With South Sudan’s Minister of  Agriculture: Infrastructure is the Key 

Lawrence Freeman

December 15, 2012

Min.Betty Achan Ogwaro: Yes. Our population is approximately 9 million people; the land is big, but the population is not very big. Infrastructure is the key to development of agriculture. In infrastructure, transport is the major key. The transport includes roads, waterways; it includes rails, and also air. And then, electricity and dams-all these are within the infrastructure. And that is the number one, key priority of the government.

So thegovernment is trying to put all its money to develop some of this infrastructure. What they cannot do alone, they can negotiate with a neighboring country. With Uganda, they’ve already negotiated—Uganda is bringing the road up to the border of Sudan at Nimule, and now USAID is doing the Nimule-Juba road, which is paved. That is the longest paved road ever in South 

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Interview: Kamal Ali Mohammed Sudan Irrigation Minister:   Build Infrastructure, Use Water Resources

May 20, 2011

Sudan as a whole has been self-sufficient in basic food requirements in the past, and its agricultural potential is enormous: Fully 40% of the land area is fertile and arable. Studies have shown that if Sudan’s full potential were reached, it could provide over 1 billion tons of food, enough to feed North Africa and the Horn. Yet in 2002, only 16% of that area was actually being cultivated. The seasonal lack of rainfall can create acute food shortages, especially in central Sudan

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Sudan Inaugurates Continental Railway

Hussein Askary

January 14, 2010

  African nations, with the Republic of Sudan taking a leading role, have given life to the project of connecting and integrating West and East Africa through a modern railway network. The dreams of a Dakar-Djibouti railway and a Cairo-Cape Town line, were born more than a hundred years ago, but colonialism and imperial schemes to divide and conquer Africa have prevented them from being realized. Now, the time has come for their renaissance.
  A conference of the transport ministers of member states of the Organization of the Islamic Conference (OIC) was held in Khartoum, Sudan, Dec. 10-12, 2009, to discuss launching what is officially known now as the Dakar-Port Sudan Railway Line. The OIC is an assembly of 57 predominantly Muslim nations, extending  from Asia through the Middle East to Africa.

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Sudan’s ‘TVA’: A Development Model for All of Africa

Hussein Askary

April 17, 2009

  In the past two months, since the illegal “arrest warrant” was issued by the ICC against Bashir, the President has inaugurated several infrastructure projects, including the Merowe Dam and the Tuti Bridge in Khartoum. The
latter connects, for the first time, Khartoum city to the island of Tuti that is located at the conjuncture of the Blue and White Nile rivers at the capital.
   I have written about the economic potential of Sudan, and specifically, the Merowe Dam hydro-power and the water project in its vicinity and their impact on the agricultural potential of Sudan as the  “Breadbasket of Africa.” However, after visiting Sudan earlier this month, seeing the magnitude of these development projects, and talking with young Sudanese engineers at the Dam Implementation Unit (DIU), I realized that my view of the whole process has to be adjusted to match the reality.

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New Merowe Dam Angers Sudan’s Enemies

Hussain Askary

March 13, 2009

One day before the illegal International Criminal Court (ICC) issued its arrest warrant against Sudan’s President Omar Hasan al-Bashir for alleged war crimes, al-Bashir led a national celebration on March 4 marking the accomplishment of one of the largest engineering projects in all Africa in decades, the Merowe Dam. The President, surrounded by thousands of Sudanese citizens and farmers benefitting from the project, gave the start-up signal for the dam’s first two turbines (of ten). This comprehensive hydroelectric agro-industrial project was built with the help of China, and financed by Sudan, China, and some Arab countries. The turbines are provided by the French company Alstom, and the consulting services by the German firm Lahmeyer International.

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Infrastructure Takes Root in Niger Delta

Lawrence Freeman

August 18, 2006

   Sir Henri Deterding, who created the Royal Dutch Shell oil ing’s Royal Dutch Shell oil company in the early 20th Century, and later supported Adolf Hitler’s drive to create a Third Reich Empire, would be happy to see how Royal Dutch Shell has destroyed Nigeria, and water, and prevented it from becoming an independent sovereign nation.

   Royal Dutch Shell, which first discovered oil in Nigeria in 1956, has been in the forefront of implementing genocide in Nigeria. The genocidal policy for sub-Saharan Africa continues to this day to be: Remove the African “natives” above the ground, to steal the resources under the ground.

   The week-long fact-finding tour by EIR of the Rivers and Bayelsa states, located in the oil- and gas-rich Niger Delta region, sensuously revealed the effects of this ongoing policy and, most significantly, the actions being taken by progressive state leaders to reverse decades of intentional devastation in the region.

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Proposed great projects for Africa 

Jacques Cheminade, former French Presidential candidate, delivered the following keynote speech to the conference of the Schiller Institute in Paris on July II, 1995.

We are at a moment in history when Africa is being subjected to violence, poverty, and death. Africa is truly a victim of triage, a racist triage which excludes and eliminates whoever is politically and economically weakest. Everybody knows it, most of them say it, and no one–or nearly no one–does anything that might be needed to take up the challenge.
First of all, the Schiller Institute wishes to open up a forum for debate, where each person might contribute whatever unites us and not what separates us, whatever unites us in order to wage war against death and indifference. This debate has no meaning unless it leads to action; in that sense, it is a search for the common good between francophone Africans and anglophone Africans, between Islam and Christianity, to the ancient light of the animism of the griots [African poet/musicians] and the oracles; as well as a search for the common good between Africans and non-Africans–or rather, among Africans in the larger sense, since, through our origins, we are all indebted to Africa.

We must give back to Africa the right of development and progress, which is the first of the human rights. To do this, the European countries must change their own policies. both vis-a-vis the South, that is, Africa. 

[What follows is a list of great projects for Africa.]

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